Twenty Percent Cooler

Chris Sims, senior writer of ComicsAlliance, co-writer of Down Set Fight and Subatomic Party Girls, and the Teen Tycoon of Rock

Q
Weird question but, I've always wondered- When you're conducting long-form interviews (like the one with Scott Snyder), about how long do you usually end up talking to people? And how long does it take you to transcribe the audio into text?
from:jsa1036
A

The Snyder interviews in particular go for about an hour, and transcription takes about two or three for each half. I actually don’t mind transcribing at all — interviews are my favorite thing to do.

Q
I really enjoyed your "Batman 3000" post the other day. (That giant pink space alien Robin is top notch stuff) Would you and J. Gonzo ever consider doing it as a COPRA-style homage/fan-comic kind of thing?
A

I thought about doing exactly that for years, but the problem is that a lot of my ideas, the ones about Batman, Wonder Woman, Superman and so on, use all the STUFF that goes along with them. Like, for Batman 3000, it wasn’t just Batman, it was Batman and his relationship with Talia and the League of Assassins, patching up a hole in the Legion of Super-Heroes’ future and calling back to the sci-fi stories of the ’50s — and that’s before J brought in Robin and Bat-Mite to really seal it.

I’d love to do the “filing off the serial numbers” sort of thing and do the story with analogues, like Supreme or Edison Rex or even Squadron Supreme, but without being able to use that specific stuff, you lose a lot of the impact and a lot of the reason for existing. A kid fighting against Talia in 3014 AD to revive the legacy of Batman is something that’s easy to care about, but if he’s just fighting for the “legacy” of a character you’ve never heard of, how much interest are you going to lose just from the start? The stuff is the thing in that story, sadly, and doing it as an analogue character would mean that I’d have to go out of my way to explain everything and set it all up, while at the same time having less impact.

Besides, I can just do analogue stuff in Dracula.

Q
Which Sentai series do you think had the best costumes?
A

I really like the Samurai/Shinkenger costumes a lot, but my favorites are probably the Gokaiger pirate suits or the Go-Busters costumes.

Q
So you live with the Cheat and answer emails. Are you Strong Bad? And if you hate Homsar so much, why don't you kill him?
from:Anonymous
A

Q
Did you see the solicit for Grayson that mentions him fighting the beast from the east?
from:Anonymous
A

I did not, but now I have to call Seeley again and see if it’s Bam Bam Bigelow or KGBeast.

comicsalliance:

HERE’S THE THING, EPISODE 4: A BRIEF HISTORY OF JACK KIRBY’S CADMUS INSTITUTE

This week, Chris takes a viewer question from someone curious about Cadmus Institute, a fixture of the DC universe created by the legendary Jack Kirby that has its roots in the Golden Age and continues to operate in the background of comics all the way to the 21st Century.

Show Notes:

comicsncoolshit:

MS. MARVEL #6G. WILLOW WILSON (W) • Jacob Wyatt (A)Cover by Jamie McKelvie View high resolution

comicsncoolshit:

MS. MARVEL #6
G. WILLOW WILSON (W) • Jacob Wyatt (A)
Cover by Jamie McKelvie

(via mckelvie)

vintagehenshin:

"The Cyborg-Fighting Superman, Kamen Rider! Starts April 3rd at 7:30!"

Promotional photos and advertisement for KAMEN RIDER, c. 1971.

(via bigredrobot)

comicsalliance:

INTERVIEW: TIM SEELEY ON ‘GRAYSON’, NIGHTWING’S ALL-NEW SPY ADVENTURE
By Chris Sims
Last week, the news broke that Dick Grayson would no longer be operating as Nightwing, instead being relaunched into a new spy-themed adventure series called Grayson, by Tim Seeley, Tom King and Mikel Janin. Spinning out of the events of Forever Evil that saw his identity revealed to the world, the new series finds the former Robin, former Nightwing and former Batman (dude has a long resumé) joining up with Spyral, a mysterious organization that first appeared in Batman Incorporated.


ComicsAlliance: I’m a fan of Dick Grayson, but I grew up in the ’90s, so my attachment to him is mostly from the Chuck Dixon/Scott McDaniel Nightwing series, rather than being a fan of him as Robin or a member of the Teen Titans. I always thought of him as a solo hero, this guy who was a cop by day, which was an interesting twist. Because of that, I think of him as this adaptable character who’s had all kinds of different roles, from sidekick to team leader to becoming Batman himself and secretly owning a circus. But getting into the espionage game, that’s a new approach. How did it come about?

Tim Seeley: As far as how they made the decision for the end of Forever Evil and Nightwing, that was before my time. I basically just one day got an e-mail that said “What would you do with Dick Grayson as a secret agent for something? We don’t know what, we just think he might work really well in some kind of spy genre thing, where his name is the title of the book, it’s not about secret identities.” I didn’t really think I had any ideas for it, so I sat on it for a few days, but then I was thinking about Spyral.

I loved Morrison’s Batman Inc. stuff, all the Batman stuff by Morrison was great. I was thinking about how he’d throw out a hundred ideas an issue, and maybe not even follow up on five of them. I knew he was doing a book with Burnham over at Image, and thought “Well, Grant’s not going to use Spyral. He’s done with that.” It occurred to me that if Dick was going to be a spy for something, it would be such a shame to waste Spyral, which was so full of unlimited potential. It already had this tie to the Bat-verse, it had great visuals, it has this “Are they good guys or bad guys?” thing. They were founded by a Nazi scientist, but they seem to be working for the side of good, we know they hire superheroes because they hired the Hood — all these things hit me, like “Why don’t we use these for Grayson?”

READ MORE View high resolution

comicsalliance:

INTERVIEW: TIM SEELEY ON ‘GRAYSON’, NIGHTWING’S ALL-NEW SPY ADVENTURE

By Chris Sims

Last week, the news broke that Dick Grayson would no longer be operating as Nightwing, instead being relaunched into a new spy-themed adventure series called Grayson, by Tim Seeley, Tom King and Mikel Janin. Spinning out of the events of Forever Evil that saw his identity revealed to the world, the new series finds the former Robin, former Nightwing and former Batman (dude has a long resumé) joining up with Spyral, a mysterious organization that first appeared in Batman Incorporated.

ComicsAlliance: I’m a fan of Dick Grayson, but I grew up in the ’90s, so my attachment to him is mostly from the Chuck Dixon/Scott McDaniel Nightwing series, rather than being a fan of him as Robin or a member of the Teen Titans. I always thought of him as a solo hero, this guy who was a cop by day, which was an interesting twist. Because of that, I think of him as this adaptable character who’s had all kinds of different roles, from sidekick to team leader to becoming Batman himself and secretly owning a circus. But getting into the espionage game, that’s a new approach. How did it come about?

Tim Seeley: As far as how they made the decision for the end of Forever Evil and Nightwing, that was before my time. I basically just one day got an e-mail that said “What would you do with Dick Grayson as a secret agent for something? We don’t know what, we just think he might work really well in some kind of spy genre thing, where his name is the title of the book, it’s not about secret identities.” I didn’t really think I had any ideas for it, so I sat on it for a few days, but then I was thinking about Spyral.

I loved Morrison’s Batman Inc. stuff, all the Batman stuff by Morrison was great. I was thinking about how he’d throw out a hundred ideas an issue, and maybe not even follow up on five of them. I knew he was doing a book with Burnham over at Image, and thought “Well, Grant’s not going to use Spyral. He’s done with that.” It occurred to me that if Dick was going to be a spy for something, it would be such a shame to waste Spyral, which was so full of unlimited potential. It already had this tie to the Bat-verse, it had great visuals, it has this “Are they good guys or bad guys?” thing. They were founded by a Nazi scientist, but they seem to be working for the side of good, we know they hire superheroes because they hired the Hood — all these things hit me, like “Why don’t we use these for Grayson?”


READ MORE